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ICU nurse shares experiences on COVID-19 frontline, losing father to same virus – WLWT Cincinnati

Lindsey Fairchild is living both sides of a heartbreaking story. Born and raised in Cincinnati, she now works as a critical care ICU nurse in Daytona Florida, tending to the sickest COVID patients day after day.”I’ve had patients that have begged me please don’t leave me in here by myself, I don’t want to die in here alone,” Fairchild said.She also watched her own father slowly succumb to the virus.”Within just a few hours he had gone from talking and being alert, to not only being intubated in a rotoprone bed, he was now in multi organ failure,” Fairchild said.Fairchild’s father, Wayne Oney, was 69 years old.Oney had asthma and diabetes, but neither condition was severe.He spent 26 days in the ICU where his prognosis progressively worsened.Fairchild made the trip to Atrium Medical Center in Middletown during his final days.All she could do was hold her hand up to the glass, as two nurses sat at her father’s bedside for hours until he passed.”There is some beauty to be found in it too because, those two nurses, you know, what they’re going through and what they’re doing, it’s heartbreaking, but how compassionate of them to do that for him, and for me, and for us you know? For our family?” Fairchild said.Fairchild feels for those nurses because she is one of them.The hospital where she works has hit max capacity.”A patient goes in a room and they either get better and go home or they pass away and they clean the room and the next one is already ready to come through the door,” Fairchild said.She said staffing has become an issue due to the high number of critical patients.Many nurses also choosing to step away due to the emotional and physical toll the job has taken.”We’re not taking lunch breaks because we don’t want our patients to pass away while we’re outside the door,” Fairchild said.She wants people to take the virus seriously, because the thousands of people who didn’t make it aren’t simply a statistic.”That’s a human being that had a life, that had a family that had community they lived in, and friends and interests and hobbies, like they’re not just numbers, they’re people,” Fairchild said.

Lindsey Fairchild is living both sides of a heartbreaking story.

Born and raised in Cincinnati, she now works as a critical care ICU nurse in Daytona Florida, tending to the sickest COVID patients day after day.

“I’ve had patients that have begged me please don’t leave me in here by myself, I don’t want to die in here alone,” Fairchild said.

She also watched her own father slowly succumb to the virus.

“Within just a few hours he had gone from talking and being alert, to not only being intubated in a rotoprone bed, he was now in multi organ failure,” Fairchild said.

Fairchild’s father, Wayne Oney, was 69 years old.

Oney had asthma and diabetes, but neither condition was severe.

He spent 26 days in the ICU where his prognosis progressively worsened.

Fairchild made the trip to Atrium Medical Center in Middletown during his final days.

All she could do was hold her hand up to the glass, as two nurses sat at her father’s bedside for hours until he passed.

“There is some beauty to be found in it too because, those two nurses, you know, what they’re going through and what they’re doing, it’s heartbreaking, but how compassionate of them to do that for him, and for me, and for us you know? For our family?” Fairchild said.

Fairchild feels for those nurses because she is one of them.

The hospital where she works has hit max capacity.

“A patient goes in a room and they either get better and go home or they pass away and they clean the room and the next one is already ready to come through the door,” Fairchild said.

She said staffing has become an issue due to the high number of critical patients.

Many nurses also choosing to step away due to the emotional and physical toll the job has taken.

“We’re not taking lunch breaks because we don’t want our patients to pass away while we’re outside the door,” Fairchild said.

She wants people to take the virus seriously, because the thousands of people who didn’t make it aren’t simply a statistic.

“That’s a human being that had a life, that had a family that had community they lived in, and friends and interests and hobbies, like they’re not just numbers, they’re people,” Fairchild said.

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